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20130819
20130819
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
we've came from the city of st. francis has never gotten and that's distinguished us. project hope has been about our expression now conditionally 50 times. our compassion and our opportunity for everyone who lives and works here to demonstrate that compassion. to each other. to that make this city a safer city and a more successful city but for the city for the 1 hundred percent. i want to a thank las vegas e devon and the whole staff for being here and the public health department. i want to thank our sf thank you and today sports 6 hundred members of our technology companies that point to experience not only the use of technology but also express their compassion for the city in giving back to a city that's helped them be successful. today, we have four very special sponsors and thank you for keeping your rates down. sprint for keeping us communicated prima facia. and virgin mobile and assurance wireless. their not only sponsors here but have brought anti volunteers and every time we get those opportunities you know what it's like first year perhaps for the first time looking so
when they call. we address the calls accordingly. we tend to use the numbers favorably. >> back to what this chief said, i certainly understand the fact that staffing drives a lot of this and i think it would be useful for us given where we are in terms of staffing to have a conversation of what would it take in terms of resources to get to the right amount of staffing prior to 18 if that's where we are now and talking about making changes that could expand hours i'm sure this community could be very interested in working with the police department to get to that point, 2018 is a long time. but i think that to expedited the right result with staffing, there are things we can do right now. we are undermining our own efforts to grow the economy and hopefully we don't have to wait to have those conversations. >> okay. berry, did you want to say something? >> supervisor really hit on it fairly quickly as well. that is i was just going to ask chief sur if there is anything that our industry can do to expedited the staffing and the resources that might be needed to help in light of the econom
? gorgeous on her first day, tweet us at my fox dc. dozens of homes evacuated after a gas leak in the neighborhood. workers were digging near summerhill and northham roads. firefighters went door to door telling everyone to get out. >> as soon as i opened the door, gas filled through the house. we had a baby over here, miss bee's child care across the street. >> about 80 homes affected. washington gassies the leak. >> coming up, a warning if you are headed to the skins game, find out why certain bags are no longer allowed. >> a new twist in nsa investigation, find out why a man has the white house answering questions. >> massive wild fire out west tackling the blaze the size of denver, gary? >> big fire. we have clouds, no real showers if you are headed to the game, weather wise no issues. here is what it looks like out there now. it is going to start feeling more like august. we have a first look at your forecast all coming up, stay with us.  >> the unrest continues in egypt nearly a week after a government crack down after oust of president morsi. two
, as well for our rec and park department as phil knows all too well many rec centers still use dial up service. when we think about registering our children for camps and play grounds, what we need to do in our daily lives, but also our government on a daily basis to use technology, this will be an incredible boone to our rec and park department and something we should all be very excited about. in terms of the details of the gift, google is providing a $600,000 financial gift to our city with no strings attached. i think a lot of the prior debate around free wi-fi in san francisco that never moved forward was because of different questions about business models or so forth, to emphasize this is a free gift of financial benefit to the city of san francisco with no strings attached. the money will come through sf city which will manage the installation of the wi-fi network from beginning to end, and our department of technology will accept that gift on behalf of the city and county of san francisco. and ultimately rec and park will be the host of the wi-fi network on their properties. a
. this is going on at the same time with the u.s. credibility at stake. your colleagues are calling for the u.s. aid to egypt be pulled. it passes through the suez canal. also so many things hang in the balance for the region because for the u.s. that has been our regional ally for an arab state. does the u.s. have any real leverage here with the money, the 1.6 billion in aid? or if we take it away does it mean that someone else is going to come in, a foreign entity to fill that financial void. >> that is an important point, thomas. we have already given most of that aid, the $1.3 billion, only about 500 million that has yet to be given during this fiscal year. we have delayed the delivery of f-16 planes and withheld the apache helicopter. they are very interested in getting the military equipment from us and ironically, that money goes to u.s. defense contractors. i think this issue is much bigger than withholding aid. this is a relationship that has been developed over decades with mu bar ark who was a dictator as well. you're absolutely correct when you say that this is a pivotal relationshi
wallace came up with the idea of a garden tour and a lot of us thought, a garden tour? our neighborhood? who is going to come? well, we had every -- we've done it for six years. every year we've grown incrementally. after the first two years of raising money for the library -- there's our new library -- we then it was such a great community builder that we recently decided to keep wanting to volunteering and do it. we established a scholarship at city college for the horticultural department. and we have just gone gangbusters. we get good press and we get to see everybody's neighbor -- all our neighbors' gardens. because of the way san francisco s you get to be veuyer because usually you have to go through their garage or their house to see the gardens. and ruth gets known through the neighborhood because she's constantly peeking over fences and leaving fliers in people's mailboxes saying, do you want to be on the garden tour, and all this sort of thing. but anyway, so, we've -- just to show you how much the neighborhood has gotten to know each other, all the people in the portola, wave
awards here at san francisco city hall. thank you all so much for joining us here tonight. it is an honor to be here. my name is daniel homsby and i am the program manager for the neighborhood department networks. an honor to see you here. many of the same faces for the fifth year for the men awards. let's give you an a plays for coming back. (applause) >> and celebrating one of the most important things we have in san francisco, which is our neighborhoods. without further ado, i'd like to start the program off by introducing my colleague, christina palone, the new director for the mayor's office for neighborhoods. christina palone. (applause) >> good evening, everyone. i'm happy to be a part of such a great ebit that celebrates the contributions made by residents and organizations throughout the city to make san francisco one of the greatest places to live. the mayor's office of neighborhood services also known as mons focuses on neighborhood outreach and engagement. it is an honor to be here with community leaders who are dedicated to the same principles and are positive
the past three years and that has taken us from a college that served 110,000 students to a college that serves 85,000 students. there was a statement that said that we didn't review our mission statement for the last four years. well, i just want to say that's false. we didn't review our mission statement, but what we prioritized in our mission statement was access. we said that the person that is getting their ged or getting their esl classes is just as important as a person that's getting their engineering degree or looking to transfer to u.c. berkeley or to stanford. those are our values. these mission statement might not have been to what they liked, but it was an expression of our values as san franciscans that we think everybody dunkelberg -- this should be a campus that's for everybody. and there were comments about our fiscal management that we have to say that city college is actually the first college [speaker not understood] to be the first college to return to pre-recession revenues thanks to the parcel tax and prop 30, we were on track to get all the money that we lost
is the accountability by the acc/jc, who is it accountable to? >> they're accountable to the u.s. department of education. >> and -- >> and again, it's a peer. it is not a private organization. they're elected members. they are representing all the institutions in california. >> so, you know, i've heard that they get some funding from some foundations. do you know whether or not that's the case? >> i don't. >> do you think that would be relevant to know how objective they are? >> my job is to focus on meeting the accreditation standards so that we retain our education and this institution. i know everybody here in the room understands the vital importance that it has for the city and community. and accreditation is the public assurance that we meet a standard that all institutions are held to. and that is our goal. that's my goal and role. and, again, vice harris came and he spoke to the leadership of our institution. he spoke with -- it was a group meeting. it included academic senate leadership, classified senate leadership, afp 21 21, aeiu [speaker not understood], department chair, and h
not understood] because it was a waste of money. and now we see the staff smiling at us and telling us that they are advocating for students of color. i'm tired of like all these people telling us, talking about our reality when they don't really connect with us and, you know, it's really sad and it's [inaudible]. you know. frustrating to see [inaudible]. >> thank you. next speaker, please. (applause) >>> hello, my name is [speaker not understood] i'm part of [speaker not understood]. i'm pacific islander on campus and one of the few pacific islanders advocating for all the pis [speaker not understood]. i'm happy that you're here because all of these people live in your jurisdiction. so, thank you so much and john avalos. i just want to state that six years ago i started at ccsf and this fall i'll be transferring to sf state. it took me six years, but three years throughout my six years to advocate and ask for resources and ask for implementations on policies that affect my people, my pacific islander folks. the same people who are here to attack and judge accjc were the same people wh
looking for tax breaks includes low-income housing but proposes those residents use a separate entrance. >>> plus, veteran denied his dream to play college football, but this college athlete is being told he can't play for the ncaa this season. >>> but first, the "news nation" is following saudi arabia's new message to the west over egypt. if you pull aid, we'll, quote, offer a helping hand. saudi arabia's foreign minister pledged his helping hand to the egyptian military has president obama faces growing calls from members of congress to cut off billions of dollars of aid to egypt. >> if we threaten to cut off aid and not do it, you lose your credibility and influence. >> with the recent violent crack dou crackdown, i do not see how we can continue aid. >>> also, a court ordered that hosni mubarak, the former dictator deposed in the arab spring uprising, ordered he be released while awaiting trial. attorneys for mubarak said he could be free within days, though some say that's unlikely. the news came hours after mass gunmen attacked many buses carrying egyptian police officers
. i just want to give you a window into -- i used to be the director of the eops program, external opportunity program services. cop has three services in the program. if city college closes what would happen to these 1500 students? all of the members of the eops program, it's a state funded program. all the eops [speaker not understood] in the state of california have been [speaker not understood] a certain number of students it can serve. if all these students -- if city college closes, there are students [speaker not understood]. there are second chance students, ex offenders, [speaker not understood] based on their income. if all of these students lose the opportunity to attend city college of san francisco, their surrounding community colleges in the bay area will also have a limit, a cap on the number of students it can serve. mostly unlikely it will be able to attend another community college in the area. so, what would happen to san francisco with an additional 1500 students, ex offenders, low-income students, [speaker not understood] who cannot go to college, lose fund to
the press" this sundays, discussing the u.s. aid, the billions of dollars sent to egypt from this country. let's play it. >> the acts of the last few days by the egyptian military are completely unconscionable. i do believe we have to change our aid. i think also we have to have included in the legislation and national security waiver. >> p.j., a spokesperson said the same thing, that the aid is under review. put this in perspective now that you have saudi arabia saying we will fill the hole if said is removed. it seems all along that we in the states were talking about possible influence in egypt because of these billions of dollars when, in fact, this money could have always been replaced by other arab nations. >> sure. i mean, it just highlights that we have a relatively weak hand we're plag we're playing. we're a relatively influential country, but our ability to direct what's happening in egypt and the ripple effects of democracy in that country, what it says about the reach and the position of the united states in the region, you know, events are being driven by others. we're reacti
that kind of brings us all together. we clearly have some differences of opinion in which each of our energies want to be focused. but i think the best thing that we can do for our students is to, is to calm them and let them know that the college is open, that we're registering our kids -- (applause) >> that enrollment is going to be really important. if we continue to have our kids and all of our students concerned about whether or not we are really invested in keeping city college open and that we have this one-year period in which to make it happen, the drop-off for city college will continue to shift. and when we do secure, retain our accreditation in the coming years, the drop-offer of enrollment from this year will have deep effects for the following year and going forward ~. so, i know that we all want to kind of focus on areas that we think that we can really tackle, whether it's, you know, questioning the acc/jc -- by the way, you know, the mayor hasn't thought about whether we're being differently than anyone else because all the other colleges have met the standards of the
to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a replacement.
have joining with us ~ supervisor avalos who will begin to steer the conversation for this item. ~ accreditation supervisor avalos, would you like to offer opening remarks? >> yes. yes, i would. thank you very much, chair cohen. and thank you for co-sponsoring this hearing along with supervisor campos as well. >> thank you. >> this is an emergency hearing that we've called, really to address big concerns in san francisco about potential closing of city college. we have heard members of the board of supervisors, while we don't have direct jurisdiction over city college, we under just how important city college is to san francisco for so many reasons. we have our work force programs train thousands of people to be prepared for our local aloe economy. in a way, city college serve as an economic engine for the city to help prepare the work force for that. there are many people who use city college to prepare for four-year institutions and allow youth of color, especially [speaker not understood] is an institution where they can actually go on to four-year institutions and city colle
without sanction, without, you know, it's given so much to awful us. no matter what accjc says about our college, we know that it will be a devastating, devastating loss to have this institution close and displace 90,000 students. you know ccsf was once the largest community college in the nation and now we've seen declining enrollment, about 15% decline enrollment and [speaker not understood]. without the college i wouldn't be able to pursue my educational goal. i'm a former foster youth. i grew upright here in san francisco, was very active in my community and came back to city college to now pursue my degree and my future and, you know, i don't know any other guidance program like the one at city college in the state. it would be devastating for me to lose the opportunity that that program provides. i mean, it provides a safety net for me as a student, to be able to get my books, to get housing assistance, to get transportation assistance, and that's just one of the programs that ccsf has to offer. i mean, this school is a gem. i mean, we are the model school for the nation. thank you
>>> i know you want more, but that's it for today's edition of "new day." thanks for joining us. cnn newsroom with carol costello begins right now. han handm handsomeness. >> i have been keeping a secret for a long time. say carol, take it away. >> okay, guys. happening now in "newsroom" -- >>> inteferno in the west. the resort town dangerously close to the flames. >>> plus, a lightning rod at a-rod. a direct hit or was it revenge? this morning a-rod's lawyers come out swinging. >>> and hours slashed, benefits cut. outrage this morning at forever 21. 30,000 workers now becoming part-time. find out what's behind this bold move. "newsroom" starts now. >>> good morning, thank you so much for joining me. i'm carol costello reporting from washington, d.c. this morning. this hour new outrage echoing across the pond. involves the man your left. his name is david miranda and the partner to the man next to him. greenwald. broke the story of edward snowden, the american contractor. greenwald's newspaper, "the guardian" says british security detained miranda for nearly nine hours yesterday
the single payer or many of us is the on the answer and in 94 or 96 that the state ballot that passed, that the single payer initiative, san franciscans passed it, californians didn't, san franciscans passed it, when we got to cfo's, we couldn't have it all by itself in san francisco, so we brought in all of the different force, we brought the federal government funding, the state funding and the employer's funding to help provide access for everything, acso is not just san francisco healthy, healthy san francisco, it's both, the mandate from the employer so they should pay their share as well as everybody, and as your attorney said today, we think aca is coming in, we're excited about the possibilities, we wanted to work but we need both systems in this city to ensure that all of our san franciscans, undocumented people who work less than 30 hours a week, all san franciscans can have access to health care, please, it's not that complicated, people won't make it that comply skated, we need both systems implemented as soon as possible, thank you very much. >> next speak e please. er >>
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)

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